Environmental Classes


EPA CERTIFIED LEAD RENOVATOR:
Available in English

EPA and Washington State Department of Commerce requires all contractors who may disturb lead paint on pre-1978 homes take a class to become a Certified Renovator and then register their Firm.

The fines hurt: Up to $37,500 for each violation.

Anyone disturbing more than 6 sq. ft. (interior) & 20 sq. ft. (exterior) of lead-based paint must get the training. Including; remodelers, painters, plumbers, electricians, maintenance personnel and property managers.

To become a Certified Renovator, you must have someone from your firm take an 8-hour course with a hands-on component. Your firm must then apply for Certification with the Department of Commerce as a Firm (company) and pay a $25 fee directly to the the State of Washington (not included in the cost of the class).

NICA brings it’s blend of easy compliance, practical application, and real answers to your questions to this training. In addition to the EPA/HUD/COMMERCE curriculum, we will provide you with valuable insights on how L&I views lead related work, along with other free resources to help your company stay in compliance.

Learn:

  • How to comply with EPA’s Renovation, Repair and Paint Rule
  • Work practices for dealing with Lead Safely
  • How to comply with L&I’s Lead Rules
Time: 8-Hour Course
Fee: Subject to local hosting agency

GHS HAZCOM TRAINING:

Available in English

Changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) are bringing the United States into alignment with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), further improving safety and health protection for America’s workers. By December 2013, employees who work with hazardous chemicals need to be trained on the new Hazard Communication Standard. Building on the success of OSHA’s current Hazard Communication Standard, the GHS is expected to prevent injuries and illnesses, save lives, and improve trade conditions for chemical manufacturers. The Hazard Communication Standard in 1983 gave the workers the ‘right to know,’ but the new Globally Harmonized System gives workers the ‘right to understand.’

The new Hazard Communication Standard still requires chemical manufacturers and importers to evaluate the chemicals they produce or import and provide hazard information to employers and workers by putting labels on containers and preparing safety data sheets. However, the old standard allowed chemical manufacturers and importers to convey hazard information on labels and material safety data sheets in whatever format they chose. The modified standard provides a single set of harmonized criteria for classifying chemicals according to their health and physical hazards and specifies hazard communication elements for labeling and safety data sheets.

Major Changes to the Hazard Communication Standard:

  • Hazard classification: Provides specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards, as well as classification of mixtures.
  • Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label that includes a harmonized signal word, pictogram, and hazard statement for each hazard class and category. Precautionary statements must also be provided.
  • Safety Data Sheets: Will now have a specified 16-section format.
  • Information and training: Employers are required to train workers by December 1, 2013 on the new labels elements and safety data sheets format to facilitate recognition and understanding.

Time: 5 Hour Course

Fee: $125 per student
Minimum Students: 12

 


Real Answers for Your Business and Safety Questions